Home Horse Care 4 Ways To Help Your Horse Cope With Fireworks

4 Ways To Help Your Horse Cope With Fireworks

by ihearthorses
63 views

Sharing is caring!

With the Fourth of July coming up and summer activities in full swing, there’s an increased chance that your horse will have to deal with fireworks. Fireworks can be frightening for any horse, and every year horses are injured or even killed because they panic. Here are four ways that you can help your horse to cope with fireworks.

Find a Safe Place for Your Horse

The most important thing that you can do to help your horse deal with fireworks is to find a safe place for him. Some horses may do better outside where they can move around freely, but be aware of the fact that if a horse panics while he’s outdoors, he could run into a fence, break through a fence, and even get loose.

Many horse owners choose to keep their horses in stalls when they know that fireworks will be set off. Stalls give you more control over your horse, and keeping your horse indoors can be a good option as long as your horse is used to being in a stall. If your horse is not accustomed to being closed into a stall, putting him inside may cause him even more stress.

Play Background Music

Image Source: JD Moar via Flickr

Image Source: JD Moar via Flickr

If possible, put your barn’s radio on as background music for your horses. Choose a soothing station, like a classical music station. Having this background noise can help to distract horses from the noise of the fireworks.

You might also consider using earplugs on any horses that you know to be highly sensitive to noise or nervous. Make sure that you get your horse used to wearing earplugs before the night of the fireworks, or they may add to his stress.

Keep Your Horse Occupied

Image Source: D Coetzee via Flickr

Image Source: D Coetzee via Flickr

Provide your horse with plenty of hay so that he constantly has food in front of him during the fireworks. Food can be an excellent way to distract horses, and many horses feel a natural urge to eat when they’re nervous. As an added bonus, hay can help to buffer your horse’s stomach from the stomach acid generated by stress, reducing the chance of him developing stomach ulcers.

Transport Your Horse Somewhere Else

Image Source: MdAgDept via Flickr

Image Source: MdAgDept via Flickr

If you know that your horse simply doesn’t cope well with fireworks, or if you won’t be around to check in on your horses, it may be a good idea to transport your horse to another stable for a few days until the displays are over. Finding a stable in a rural location may mean that your horse won’t have to deal with fireworks, which will allow both you and him to relax.

Hopefully the fireworks displays near you will be small. With a bit of preparation, you can help to keep your horse comfortable and safe.

Sharing is caring!

Comments

You may also like

Leave a Comment